German Government rejects inclusion of gays and lesbians in the Basic Law

German Government rejects inclusion of gays and lesbians in the Basic Law

Art. 3 GG

Merkel: Vorerst keine Aufnahme von Schwulen und Lesben ins Grundgesetz

Die Regierung arbeitet laut der Bundeskanzlerin derzeit nicht daran, den Diskriminierungsschutz in Artikel 3 bei einer anstehenden Überarbeitung um das Merkmal sexuelle Identität zu erweitern.

Read: https://www.queer.de/detail.php?article_id=37762&pk_campaign=Nwsl

Germany: Court says companies must offer a gender-neutral form of address

Germany: Court says companies must offer a gender-neutral form of address

Die zwangsweise Festlegung auf “Herr” oder “Frau” verletzt das Persönlichkeitsrecht, entschied das Landgericht Frankfurt. Die Anrede ist von “zentraler Bedeutung”. Geklagt hatte eine nichtbinäre Person.

Read: https://www.queer.de/detail.php?article_id=37678&pk_campaign=Nwsl

Hungary parliament passes bill defining families, curtailing rights of gay citizens

Hungary parliament passes bill defining families, curtailing rights of gay citizens

The Hungarian National Assembly, the country’s parliament, passed a bill amending the Hungarian Fundamental Law on Tuesday, which stipulates that a mother is a woman and a father is a man.

The bill, which is “intended to strengthen the protection of Hungarian families” and protect children, protects individuals’ rights to self-identify “according to their sex at birth.” The bill states that children will have upbringings based on the values of Hungary’s “constitutional identity and Christian culture.”

Section L, paragraph one of the amended Fundamental Law states: “Hungary protects the institution of marriage as the association between a man and a woman and the family as the basis for the survival of the nation. The foundation of the family is marriage and the parent-child relationship. The mother is a woman, the father is a man.”

The amendment also defined public money as “the revenues, expenditures and claims of the state.” This definition of public money was adopted for transparency, although critics claim that the amendment will loosen independent bodies’ oversight of government spending.

The amendment, which is the ninth amendment to Hungary’s constitution, was originally submitted on November 10. On Tuesday, 134 Members of Parliament voted for the bill, and five voted against it.

While the amendment goes into effect following its promulgation, the rules related to it only go into effect on July 1, 2023.

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The dangerous and oppressive countries where same-sex love is still a crime, mapped

The dangerous and oppressive countries where same-sex love is still a crime, mapped

ILGA-World homosexuality United Nations
A new report from ILGA World has revealed that same-sex sexual activity is still illegal in 69 UN member states (Image courtesy of ILGA-World)

Being gay, lesbian or bisexual is still a crime in 69 United Nations member states, a new report has revealed.

Read: https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2020/12/16/ilga-world-report-gay-bisexual-crime-illegal-united-nations-map-death-penalty/

Sex change in civil registers to become easier in Switzerland

Sex change in civil registers to become easier in Switzerland

Transgender and intersex people will be able to change their name and sex more easily in the official civil register following moves by the Swiss parliament. On Wednesday, the House of Representatives eliminated its last difference with the Senate to make this possible. In future, transgender and intersex people will be able to change their name and sex in the civil register without bureaucratic complications. There will no longer be any medical examinations or other prerequisites. Every year, about 40 children are born with indeterminate sex at birth. However, the law currently requires that they must be registered within three days with their sex and first name, which can only be changed later through an administrative or judicial procedure. At the same time, there are several hundred transgender people in Switzerland. Between 100 and 200 people have undergone or are considering an operation to change their sex. The last point of contention between the two houses of…

Read: https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/politics/sex-change-to-become-easier-in-switzerland-/46228520

USA: Supreme Court declines to take up challenge to same-sex parents on birth certificate

USA: Supreme Court declines to take up challenge to same-sex parents on birth certificate

The US Supreme Court refused to hear a case Monday that sought to reverse a lower court ruling allowing same-sex couples to be listed as birth parents on a child’s birth certificate. The case, Box v. Hendersen, was appealed from the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.

The Seventh Circuit had ruled that Indiana must presume the same-sex spouse of a biological parent is the other parent of a child unless proved otherwise, based on the existing presumption in state law that the husband of a biological mother is the parent of a child unless proved otherwise.

Indiana appealed the Seventh Circuit’s ruling, alleging that only a biological parent has legal rights and obligations to a child at birth:

Now, however, the Seventh Circuit is requiring Indiana, which merely presumes the biological paternity of a birth mother’s husband in the absence of contrary evidence, also to allocate, at birth, parental rights, reflected on the child’s birth certificate, to the birth-mother’s wife. Doing so, however, is in tension with the traditional, constitutionally protected understanding that, at birth, only a baby’s biological parents have legal rights and obligations toward the child. To protect these rights, Indiana lists a child’s biological parents, and no one else, on the child’s birth certificate unless the child is legally adopted. This case, then, is about whether Indiana may, to advance its unquestionably legitimate policy of safeguarding the rights and obligations of biological parents in the context of completing birth certificates, presume a birth-mother’s husband to be the biological father of the child, without also presuming the “parentage” of a birth-mother’s wife. States need guidance with respect to the permissible constitutional parameters of laws allocating paternal and maternal presumptions at birth, and the Court’s decision in Pavan has proven insufficient in that regard. There, the Court had before it only the most basic, binary allocation of parental rights at birth, and a state law that plainly discriminated between opposite-sex and same-sex couples. Even so, three Justices of this Court would have ordered plenary review rather than summary reversal. Indiana’s law is in even greater need of plenary review, for it functions differently and ultimately treats same-sex and opposite-sex couples the same in terms of the rights of spouses of birth mothers who are not biologically related to the child.

The refusal to hear the case means that the Seventh Circuit’s ruling will stand.

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